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in support of mohamed mor morsi. today's rallies meant to counterprotest protests in the past week. morsi has been facing wide-spread unrest over that decree that expands his presidential powers. nbc jim maceda is in cairo for us on this saturday. jim, these morsi reforms were to be a test of his strength of the muslim brotherhood strength. how did they do? >> well, you're right. this was a crucial day for president morsi and his muslim brotherhood supporters. they needed a massive turnout today at that rally kind of to stem the momentum of the opposition, which, as we have reported, has seen hundreds of thousands of secular, moderate egyptians, leftists, christians all turning out in that iconic tahrir square on at least two occasions this past week alone. and which tonight, by the way, is continuing its ten-city occupation of the square. but today really did belong to morsi supporters. their show of support was very big in the tens of thousands, perhaps 100,000 or more outside cairo university and had the feeling of a political rally. waving flags, carrying banners and chanting slogans and
! zeerchlgt as one hand giveth, another taketh away. egyptian president mohammed morsi backed off a decree giving him authority. he order aid new order giving military power to arrest sls while a new constitution is finalized and voted on this saturday. former president hosni mubarak issued a similar decree before he lost power declaring emergency law in egypt. meanwhile, the national salvation front, the secular liberal opposition, is considering a boycott of the charter vote and is calling for protests in advancing the vote this weekend. joining us now from cairo is nbc news foreign correspondent amman. thank you for joining us. my first question is just about the motivations, morsi's motive augustss here. initially when this sort of power grab, if you will -- we'll call it that -- began, there was some sense and some analysis that this was an effort to -- an effort at efficiency, to get things down and that the democratic process would be restored. that seems increasingly less the case. this seems like a consolidation of power. what is your read on the situation? >> well, i think it's v
of mohammed morsi outside the presidential palace in cairo egypt. in that country's largest confrontation since the uprising of hosni mubarak. we're back with daniel henninger and editorial board member matt comiskey. so, bret. we were told if we did intervene in syria we could see chemical weapons used, civil war and radicalization and perhaps a regional conflict. >> now, we have all of those things. do you have imagine what might have happened if the obama administration had intervened early by imposing a no-fly zone at very little cost and risk to the united states over syria, if assad had been gone 12 months ago fwe were now in the midst of a transitional process with an opposition that hadn't been radicallized by the influx from jordan, iraq, from elsewhere. instead, we're having not only the syrian meltdown with serious consequences, but hundreds of thousands of refugees in turkey, destabilization of jordan and increasing inability in lebanon and this is spilling out all over the region, paul. >> paul: what about the president's red lines on-- president obama's red lines, so-called,
based on mohammed al qahtani, who was harshly interrogated, although not waterboarded. at gitmo, qahtani was one individual who identified bin laden's courier, a key break in the hunt for bin laden. when we eventually learned the courier's real name and found him, he found bin laden. in real life, one month before september 11th, qahtani was denied admission to the united states when an astute i.n.s. agent named jose melendez perez wouldn't allow him to enter the airport. so qahtani returned to the middle east and was later apprehended fighting with bin laden at tora bora. the 9/11 commission later determined he was to have been the 20th hijacker. part of the evidence? 9/11 ringleader mohamed atta awaited him at the orlando airport. so for me, "zero dark thirty" is a reminder of the power of one person. one week ago today, we saw the power of one individual to do horrific things. well, this was the opposite. if jose melendez perez had allowed qahtani into the united states, he would have been aboard flight 93. arguably, his added muscle could have kept the passengers at bay for the 20 mo
where there are new developments in the power struggle that started with p mohamed morsi's grab for new powers. we're there with details. ayman, we got word there were some considerations there to issue a new koconstitutional declaration of some sort. what can you tell us about all this? >> reporter: sure. it's important to set what triggered these protests two weeks ago, a constitutional declaration by president morsi that was seen as a power grab, gave him sweeping powers through the transitional period. it triggered protests. one of the central demands of the protesters and the opposition to the president has been that he rescind that dec e decree. for the past several days the p president has been trying to figure out a way to kind of minimize the scope of that decree. i has not worked. it has not pleased the opposition. today he met with some of the opposition forces, and what we're learning from egyptian state television, an official government news source, is that the prime minister has suggested that the president is considering a new constitutional declaration and perhaps in l
from violence as protests are escalating right now between those who support mohammed morsi and those who opposed him. fierce street battles today killed five people and left more than 600 injured. outside the presidential palace. that is the worst outbreak of violence since morsi's election. the protests began two weeks ago when morsi took almost absolute power by exempting himself from judicial oversights and his spoofers quickly passed a draft constitution. at a white house briefing yesterday, press secretary jay carney refused to take sides or to say whether president obama supports the islamist leader but he did say the united states continues to have an important relationship with egypt. >>> turning to a disaster here at home, the white house says it will send in an emergency request to capitol hill this week asking for up to $60 billion to help recover from hurricane sandy. if approved, much of the money will go toward rebuilding homes and communities but top administrators say they want at least some of the f
. here's a quick look at other top stories making news right now. egypt's president, mohammed morsi rolling back part of the power grab he took two weeks ago which sparked violent protests, he insists referendum on a new constitution crafted by his islamist allies will go ahead and scheduled next weekend. meanwhile, nelson mandala remains in a south african hospital on this sunday. sources close to the mandala family tell nbc news there's quote no sense of panic. mandala had sympttomach surgery earlier this year. >>> and the fbi's headquarters may be moving. not soon, though, but perhaps eventually. the building sits right between the white house and the capitol. it's prime d.c. real estate so the agency that oversees the federal buildings is calling on ideas about where else it could house the gumshoe headquarters. in exchange they'll consider throwing in the j. edgar hoover building and the land it stands on. >>> turning to weed now, marijuana reform backers got a huge boost in november when voters in colorado and washington state legalized recreational pot. recent polls have foun
of the muslim brotherhood and other islamists rallied behind mohamed morsi. nbc's jim maceda is in cairo with the latest on that. >> hi, craig. supporters really needed a massive turnout today at their rally to stem the momentum of the opposition, which has seen hundreds of thousands of real mix of secular, moderate, leftist, liberal, christian and other minority egyptians who have been filling up tahrir square over the past week and which tonight, by the way, continues its ten-city occupation of the square. today in the end belonged to morsi supporters. their show of support was big, at least in the tens of thousands, perhaps 100,000 or more outside cairo university and it really had the feel of a political rally. there were people waving flags, carrying banners and chanting pro-morsi sloegers. there were some clashes reported, not in cairo, but in the north in alexandria between pro and anti-morsi groups. overall, however, the day was peaceful. that's because the muslim brotherhood is much more focused on politics than on protests. it wants to see as quickly as possible the ratificatio
or announced any formal charges as of yet. >>> other stories topping the news, mohamed morsi returned to the presidential palace after tens of thousands of protesters charged that complex yesterday. >>> bad news for workers at citigroup, the bank is planning to cut 11,000 jobs worldwide in an effort to save $1.1 billion a year. >>> congress now planning to restore lifelong secret service protection for former presidents, a response to growing national security threats since 9/11. >>> a new poll shows a split moaning americans on same-sex marriage but reverses the trend of the 55% who opposed same-sex marriage in '08 versus the 36% who supported it. >>> police are looking for a 11-year-old leukemia patient seen being walked out of an arizona hospital with her mom. they say this may be a case of child endangerment because the catheter in her heart could become infected. >>> and finally for you a spokesperson for the royal couple says the duchess of cambridge, kate middleton, is continuing to feel better after being admitted to the hospital on monday due to a severe bout of morning sickn
. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi has given the military the authority to make arrests. this after saturday's revoking of a constitutional decree failed to put an end to the protests. >>> syrian rebels say they've captured a part of a large military base. it would be the latest in a series of setbacks for the assad regime. >>> south african officials say nelson mandela is doing very well after spending a second night in a hospital for what they are calling routine tests. >>> dallas cowboys player josh brent was released from jail on a $500,000 bond. brent was charged with intoxication manslaughter after a car crash that killed his friend and teammate jerry brown. >>> two university of colorado students have been arrested after allegedly feeding pot brownies to their classmate and a college professor. three people including the professor were hospitalized after eating those brownies. >>> still ahead, the new health care law means new taxes are about to go into effect. but who's going to be footing the bill for that one? joining me next, "the washington post's" ez ra klein breaks it down. >>>
, mohammed that is returning to the palace. he took off amid violent protest. why are they outraged? mursi is expanding his powers. several tv stations going black to protest. >> brian: 11 newspapers went dark yesterday. >> gretchen: thank you. it was taughted as a dream and boeing dream liner forced to make an emergency landing. united flight was heading from houston to newark, new jersey . a latest problem happening on the same day regulators ordered inspections for the jets for a possible fue line problem. intelligence director james clapper upon will testify behind closed doors about the attack on benghazi that left four americans dead. it was initially referred to al-qaida. revised talking points were used by susan rice who blamed the video. >> she lived 116 years and 100 days. besse cooper passed away and died peacefully in monroe, georgia. cooper was born in 1896 in tennessee and moved to georgia in world war i to be a teacher. what was the secret to her long life. she minded her own business and avoided junk food. >> brian: was not upset we had the twinkie problem. >> steve: not a
. i'm chris hayes. a draft of egypt's new constitution will be delivered to president mohamed morsi today. private first class bradley manning accused of leaking classified documents to wikileaks will return to court in fort meade maryland. right now i'm joined by richard a renberg. allen frumin who retired as parliamentarian of the u.s. senate last year. this is his first interview since then. akil amar and sterling professor of law at yale law school. and msnbc contributor, victoria defrancesco soto. great to have you all here. all right. if president obama wants to get anything done in his second term, democrats in the senate will have to overcome one major obstacle, the filibuster. since democrats took control of both chambers of congress in 2007, republicans have used the filibuster as a bludgeon against them to pass basic legislation. the senate bills that actually passed has dropped from just over 25% to a record low of 2.8% this year. the rate held steady at 10% through the clinton and bush years and then plummeted when democrats took control of congress in 2007. that is due
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
. >> elsewhere in the region, egypt right now, we're seeing these protesters, these anti-mohammed morsi protesters moving closer and closer towards the presidential pass palace in cairo. they're concerned about what morsi is doing as far as democracy in egypt. how worried are you about the situation in egypt? >> i think egypt is key to the region, so the answer is, you've got to be extremely worried when you see instability affecting egypt. this is, again, the birth pangs of proper democracy in some ways, but this struggle is immensely important. obviously what's important in these countries where they've moved to a democratic system is that there is a clear understanding that democracy is not just a way of voting but a way of thinking. pant of that way of thinking is that you've got to protect minorities. you've got to -- democracy doesn't function unless it is accompanied by an open mind. and so you can understand there is a lot of anxiety in egypt about the constitutional changes proposed. and even as the international community obviously applauded egypt's efforts in bringing about t
. >> oh okay. i think we're very lucky your dog didn't eat your plastic boll of the profit mohammed. >> stephanie: yes. kids. kids. i have a love story. [♪ romantic music ♪] [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: it's a holiday gift with the maji -- >> don't be a wise guy. >> stephanie: listen -- >> three wise guys -- >> stephanie: there was a very touching story -- >> my grandfather was a wise guy -- >> stephanie: like my dog got the baby jesus out -- [ farting sounds ] >> stephanie: this is from scuba drew. [ scooby-doo's "huh?" ] >> stephanie: aloha momma. my wife and i first started watching you when you aired on current tv you brought many laughs to me and my wife so much, i wanted to surprise my wife for christmas, so i ordered a sexy liberal hat and coffee cup. >> nice. >> stephanie: today the package arrived and i snuck it inside. opened it up. and discovered that it contained a larry the lizard coffee cup, and so i looked at the receipt, and i realized it was ordered from my wife and not me. >> oooooooooh. [overlapping speakers] >> stephanie: and now
on the charter. guest: this has been a controversy going back. on november 2nd, not egyptian president mohammed morsi issued decrees that insulated him in the constituent assembly writing the constitution from judicial review. there was concern that if the islamists dominated, they would be resolved by the courts which are, by and large, made up of judges appointed by hosni mubarak. this has thrown a dip into turmoil and produced protests. subsequently when the constituent assembly in an overnight session approved a constitution, it has now become a battle over the constitution. host: if you would like to talk about what is happening in egypt, here are the numbers. and if you are outside the u.s., -- just watching some footage from al-jazeera, why is this significant? guest: egypt is the most populous country in the arab world. have been a strategic ally of the united states. since the uprising that ousted house. mubarak, they have tried to maintain close ties with egypt. they are at peace with israel, but a country of that size in chaos, on the verge of economic collapse, it's not good for ame
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)